A Week of Switching, Shifting, Stretching: How to Make My Thinking More Flexible by L. H. Kerstein

Released  in November of 2013, this delightful picture book, A Week of Switching, Shifting, and Stretching: How to Make My Thinking More Flexible by Lauren H. Kerstein, LCSW , will help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and all children, for that matter, in becoming less rigid in their thinking.

Readers will be motivated to change their black-and-white thinking where only ONE idea is the correct one to a “rainbow thinking” where entertaining different ideas or ways to do things can be fun and open the door to new things, new friends, new games, etc. Learning to be more flexible in their thinking will result in a happier child with fewer meltdowns and less stress for the whole family.

Educators and professionals, parents and family members can share this much needed picture book so other children and siblings can understand a child with rigid thinking. The colorful illustrations will draw children in the 4 to 10 year range. Ms. Kerstein’s book helps children who get stuck in patterns of rigid thinking and then have social, emotional, and behavioral challenges.

The book is written in the first person; therefore, children will be able to relate to Jason, the young boy speaking to them as you can see from this excerpt:

Hi! My name is Jason and I have a story to tell about my
brain.
I have a terrific brain filled with lots of stuff. I even have
great ideas…

…But the other day I learned something interesting. Ideas can change. They can stretch and shift. They can even switch.

My mom said this is called ”rainbow thinking.” She said she read this really cool book about thinking BIG.* In the book, they talked about “rainbow thinking.” I thought the lady who wrote that book sounded cool.

READ COMPLETE REVIEW of A Week of Switching, Shifting, and Stretching: How to Make My Thinking More Flexible by Lauren H. Kerstein, LCSW,  on our Special Needs Book Review site.

About the Author:

Lauren H. Kerstein, MSW author of picture book on how to make thinking more flexible.Lauren H. Kerstein, LCSW , is a licensed clinical social worker who specializes in working with children, adolescents, adults, and families. She received a Bachelor’s of Arts in Education and Psychology from Washington University in St. Louis and a Master’s in Social Work from George Warren Brown School. Lauren has also completed a post-masters fellowship at JFK Partners, the University Affiliated Program at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

In addition to children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, Lauren works extensively with children experiencing anxiety, depression, relationship skill difficulties, as well as developmental or mental health needs.

Lauren is the author of My Sensory Book: Working Together to Explore Sensory Issues My Sensory Book: Working Together to Explore Sensory Issues and the Big Feelings They Can Cause: A Workbook for Parents, Professionals, and Children by Lauren H. Kerstein, MSW and the Big Feelings They Can Cause: A Workbook for Parents, Professionals, and Children and a textbook about Asperger Syndrome; additionally, she is a guest blogger for SensorySpot.com. Finally, she is an adjunct professor at the University of Denver in the Graduate School of Social Work and a national speaker.

Follow Lauren Kerstein, LCSW: 

Book Info:

  • A Week of Switching, Shifting, and Stretching: How to Make My Thinking More Flexible
  • By Lauren H. Kerstein LCSW
  • Published by AAPC Publishing
  • ISBN: 9781937473891
  • LCCN: 2013952005
  • Page Count: 64See Also: Curvy Herbie and Straight Nate: A Lesson in Curved Line Thinking by Pamela Mari with illustrations by Dawn Rebuck.
  • Trim Size: 6 X 9
  • Paperback
  • Released 11/05/2013

Buy A Week of Switching, Shifting, and Stretching: How to Make My Thinking More Flexible: Amazon.com   Amazon.ca 

See Also from Special Needs Book Review: Curvy Herbie and Straight Nate: A Lesson in Curved Line Thinking by Pamela Mari with illustrations by Dawn Rebuck. 

READ Also: Students with Autism: Take Advantage of Special Interests and Strengths

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